Pool Closing

12 Point DIY Pool Closing Checklist

October is here, and the weather is changing to fall rather quickly. It’s time to make sure you are ready to close your pool. Hawaiian Pool Builders has provided you with a pool closing checklist to get you started in the right direction.

1. Locate all your winterizing supplies. Locate your cover, water tubes, plugs for the skimmers and return jets, and your chemicals. Don’t forget either an air compressor or a power shop vac.

2. Backwash and clean the filter. Drain the DE filter tank and leave the backwash valve open. If you have a sand filter, remove the drain plug and leave it off all winter. Put the drain plug with other items you’ve removed in the pump basket. Also, make sure the multiport valve has no water in it.

3. Disconnect and drain the pump. Make sure you remove all hoses from the pump and filter, and that the pump is drained by removing any drain plugs. Unscrew the quick disconnect fittings or unions.

4. Disconnect and drain your heater. If you have a heater, drain it and make sure there is no standing water on the inside. Remove all drain plugs. Do not remove the heater tray.

5. Remove the return jet fittings & skimmer baskets. Put the fittings and any other items you remove into the pump basket with the drain plug.

6. Blow out the return jets with an air compressor. Hook up the air compressor or shop vac to the return lines at the filter system. You can also screw the compressor into the pump drain plug outlet. Keep the air blowing until the air bubbles are visible from the return jets in the pool. Put a plug into the fitting under the water when you see the bubbles blowing at full force.

7. Blow out all of the skimmer pipes. Keep the air blowing until the air bubbles become visible from the skimmers. Put a plug in the bottom of the skimmer bucket when you see the bubbles blowing at full force. This will mean that 99% of the water is out of the pipe.

8. Blow out the main drain. When you see the bubbles coming out of the drain, plug the pipe on your end or close the gate valve. By doing this, you will cause an “air lock” in the line. No more water should enter the pipe from the pool side. NOTE: Put duct tape on all of the exposed pipes to prevent anything from getting into them.

9. Remove any additional pool equipment. Remove any ropes, ladders, floats, and diving boards from the pool. Store them safely away from the winter elements.

10. Add the winter chemicals. Mix any granular winterizing chemicals in a bucket so that they are totally dissolved. You will want to avoid any undissolved granules from settling on the pool floor which will stain the liner. If you are using any liquid winterizing chemicals, pour them into the pool as well.

11. Blow up and install your air pillow. Tie the air pillow at two places and position in the center of the pool. Tie strings to the pool wall so that pillow does not move when you install the pool cover. If you do not have a pillow, you can use tires, tubes, balls or other air filled floating objects. Throw them into the pool to take up any ice expansion.

12. Install the pool cover and water tubes. Place the cover on the pool. Make sure there are no rips. If so, patch them with duct tape or vinyl cover patches. If you use water tubes, lay out the water tubes, placing them through loops on the cover. Fill the tubes with water to approximately 85% and tightly seal them. Do not overfill the tubes. When they freeze, you do not want them to expand and split. Tubes should ideally be touching each other end to end. However, you can space them one foot apart.

By following this pool closing check list you can spend the winter with assurance that when spring comes, your pool will be ready to open. At Hawaiian Pool Builders retail store, we have the chemicals necessary for winterizing your in-ground swimming pool. We also offer full service and maintenance packages. To find out more, feel free to either stop into our showroom or call to talk to one of our pool professionals.

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